Tag Archive | Dallas

Dinosaur Valley State Park

Glen Rose, TX

One day, a long time ago, a family of plant-eating longnecks was walking along the muddy water’s edge grazing on yummy plants and ferns. Unbeknownst to them, a herd of hungry meat-eaters was hot on their trail. Let’s just say the day ended quite poorly for the plant-eaters.

What we are left with today at Dinosaur Valley State Park is the fossilized footprint evidence of this journey and the encounter. The round, elephant-like footprints were the plant-eaters and the three-toed prints were the meat-eaters. Over 100 million years ago, many types of animals lived in this shallow Mesozoic sea area. Tidal pools and coastal swamps covered what is now the state of Texas. Today, these lower Cretaceous rocks are where we find the Paluxy River and its shoreline containing hundreds of dinosaur prints.

One area within the park contains so many preserved footprints that it is named “The Ballroom” due to hundreds of tracks moving in all directions – as if they were all dancing (or trying to keep from being eaten!). Some of the prints are on the dry limestone creek beds, some are in shallow water, and some have (unfortunately) eroded over time. The park provides detailed maps showing all the track sites.

When I stood looking at some of these well-preserved footprints, I could barely wrap my head around seeing something from 105 million years ago. How is that even possible? It was the highlight of my trip, for sure.

Besides seeing the dinosaur prints in the park, my husband and I did quite a bit of hiking with our yorkie “trail dog.” There are over 20 miles of hiking trails running all through the park and the beautiful Paluxy River Valley. Trails lead into and along the river, up over limestone ridges, through shady cedar brakes, and beside grassy prairie lands. I really enjoyed our walks alongside the clear, shallow river spotting unusual rocks, dinosaur tracks, crawfish, and fish. We also saw lots of lizards, animal tracks, and beautiful wildflowers along the grassy and wooded trails.

A few of the trailheads start near the popular and more crowded attractions within the park. The Blue Hole (definitely green) looked like a family-friendly swimming area, as there were quite a few people there. The Main Track Site had the most visitors with ample parking and easy access to prints on dry land for close-up viewing. When we ventured off on many of the other trails, there were fewer people.

I suggest wearing good hiking shoes for all the varying terrain (rocks, dirt, roots, gravel) and bringing a pair of water shoes to get up close and personal to some of the tracks in shallow water and for river crossings on some trails. Pack a picnic lunch, bring plenty of water, and enjoy the park and all it has to offer!

Reservations are highly recommended as the park limits the numbers of visitors per day. The cost for a one-day pass is $7 per car. Overnight camping is also available with reservations.

See you on the trail!

Black Canyon of the Gunnison

Montrose County, CO

Another Covid-19 vacation is in the books! My family is vaccinated but we are still trying to avoid crowds when traveling. We have spent the past year renting homes/cabins and cooking most of our meals when out of town. This rural southwest part of Colorado seemed like the perfect place to check out a National Park and visit with our adult children for a few days. It turned out to be a great trip.

We took a morning flight from DFW to Montrose. The direct flight was only an hour and thirty-eight minutes – quick trip! The Montrose airport was small (4 gates) and very easy to navigate. Getting our rental Jeep was a breeze. Our Vrbo house actually ended up being a convenient ten minute drive from the airport. So far, so good! We were ready to explore the area.

The first excursion to check off our list: The Black Canyon of the Gunnison National Park. This area has only had National Park status since 1999 and I was not that familiar with it prior to our trip. After seeing a few pics on a National Park social media page recently, it got on my radar. Though not as popular as the Grand Canyon, it certainly seemed less crowded and had some spectacular views with towering walls, spiky peaks, narrow openings and startling depths. I put in a little bit of research, found out how to get there, and off we went!

The Black Canyon National Park entrance was only twenty minutes from downtown Montrose and the drive up to the park was quite scenic as our elevation changed (and ears popped!). This route took us to the park’s visitor center that featured cool displays, info on the canyon, picnic areas, restrooms, a gift shop, campgrounds, a nature trail and a great observation platform. It was well worth a stop. I got a map, a walking stick and went on my merry way.

The route through the park along the South Rim Road was easy to drive and well-marked. It allowed us beautiful views of the Black Canyon from many overlooks, most of which only required short walks. I loved seeing all the different landscapes, plants and trees along the way. Hiking there can be as simple as strolling to the various viewpoints and overlooks or as challenging as a 2,700 foot descent down into the inner-canyon to the Gunnison River, which we didn’t do (because we are sane people!).

The Black Canyon itself was breathtakingly beautiful with its dark, solid granite canyon walls that tower almost 3,000 feet above the greenish river snaking far, far below. The canyon gets its name due to the fact that certain parts of the gorge only get thirty total minutes of sunlight per day. The walls literally look black due to the shadows. It is very, very narrow and very deep! For you geology nerds, the canyon has some of the world’s oldest exposed rock that dates back two billion years to the Precambrian era. Today the impenetrable, steep cliffs provide homes and protection to the world’s fastest bird, the peregrine falcon.

We enjoyed many of the twelve lookout points along the rim with Pulpit Rock, the Painted Wall and Dragon Point being my favorites. The Painted Wall is the highest cliff (tallest vertical wall) in Colorado. From the rim down to the river, it stands 2250 feet high and as my daughter described it, “it looks like a big ole slab of marbled steak.” It is a huge, dark granite wall with wide, white “marble” streaks running through it. The size is somewhere in the neighborhood of ginormous!

At Dragon Point, the Painted Wall was across the gorge from us and far below was the Gunnison River. The river actually looked very curvy and small from our vantage spot so high above. Our view was quite deceiving. The Gunnison River actually drops an average of 43 feet per mile through the canyon, which is six times more than the Colorado River through the Grand Canyon – just to put it in perspective.

If we had more time, I would have liked to experience the canyon from the bottom up. There is a road at the park entrance that follows a steep, switch-back route into the canyon’s depths. This would certainly be a memorable day for hiking, fishing, kayaking or rock climbing. I would have loved to have seen the mighty river up close and personal. Maybe next time…

The Ute Tribe that inhabited these tribal lands for thousands of years referred to this area as “much rocks, big water.” I don’t think anyone could have said it any better.

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Immersive Van Gogh

Dallas, TX

I am a Commercial Art major and have loved Van Gogh since my days sitting in art history classes dissecting each of his paintings. When I learned that the Van Gogh exhibits were coming to Dallas, I bought tickets to both “dueling” exhibitions. My husband and I attended the first one, the original Immersive Van Gogh, this past weekend.

This exhibit is being shown in the iconic Masonic Temple known as The Lighthouse and is located on Harwood Street. It is very close to the Dallas Farmer’s Market and parking is scattered throughout the area. We paid to park in a lot just catty-cornered from the exhibit since we were not lucky enough to get nearby metered street parking.

The Lighthouse has a pretty impressive entrance and the towering steps are decorated with large pots of sunflowers and decorative lettering. Friendly staff members are stationed inside and outside to take photos of you and your group, if you like. Once you enter on the ground floor (masks are required), there are restrooms, a snack bar and gift shop. From there, attendants direct you up to the third floor where instructions are given and the show is projected.

The instructions were simple. There are three large rooms where the thirty-five minute loop plays simultaneously in each room. Walk through the rooms until you find a place to sit (chairs, benches, or the floor). Follow social distancing guidelines (this was easy to follow since fluorescent circles are marked on the theatre floors). You may take photos but without flash. Stay as long as you like. Watch the video once, twice, or until closing time. Your choice!

Once I settled in and sat down, I was taken to another world. All four walls and the floor come alive with Van Gogh’s art work. It is a sensory overload with bright, swirling colors and accompanying music and sounds. But don’t expect to see a video depicting his most famous paintings as they hang in museums today. Simply sit and watch as bold lines are drawn, windmills turn, water ripples, and roots push their way up through the earth and morph into beautiful blue irises. There are beautiful colors, brilliant lights and mesmerizing music. It all works together to create a very unique experience.

When watching the visuals unfold, I felt like there was some sort of a story being told. While researching this blog, I read two different accounts describing how the video plays out. One version said we are seeing the scenes as Van Gogh first saw them, full of movement and life-like colors as he began painting. Another version said the video illustrates how Van Gogh may have visualized his body of work at the end of his life. Regardless of what the narrative was, the show was full of beautiful, graphic images that took you to another place.

I had several favorite scenes during the night. Van Gogh’s cherry blossoms that dance and float across all four walls was one such moment. Another was the moon and stars that move across the dark skies and cause us to be transported into the swirls of Starry Night. At one point, dark brushstrokes morph into birds and fly up into the heavily textured sky. It was all a feast for the eyes.

After arriving on the exhibit floor, we had chosen the second theatre room (the largest) since we found a couple of available chairs there. We were very comfortable and had great views. On our way out, we noticed the third room had interesting mirrored spires in the middle of the sitting space. The reflections gave the video a totally different look. I would have chosen that room if I had only known!

Overall it was a very enjoyable evening. I went in with zero expectations and was really blown away by the creativity and technology that was necessary to make this show a success. My one regret – that the video was not longer. We could have stayed and watched the loop two or three times, but once I had seen it and taken it all in first time, I felt like I had gotten the full “experience.” We got up, moved on out, and let others who were waiting have our seats.

We exited the exhibit and enjoyed looking around the gift shop where one could buy a Van Gogh painting image on just about any item you could think of. Starry Night ties and socks – check. Cherry Blossom face mask – check. Smoking Skull water flask – check. Sunflower glasses case – check. Self portrait backpack, umbrella, key chain and mouse pad – check, check, check!

I hope all of you art lovers get to experience Immersive Van Gogh firsthand because it is a little difficult to fully describe. The images were truly breathtaking. The words of Don McLean’s Starry Night sum this exhibition up perfectly and played in my head all night:

Starry, starry night
Flaming flowers that brightly blaze

Swirling clouds in violet haze
Reflect in Vincent’s eyes of china blue

Colors changing hue
Morning fields of amber grain

Weathered faces lined in pain
Are soothed beneath the artist’s loving hand

Rest in peace, Vincent. ‚̧

Cheesemaking Class

Dallas, TX

I made cheese!

Evidently, you CAN teach an old dog a new trick! I recently learned how to make fresh ricotta, mozzarella, a mozzarella & olive roll and string cheese. The Mozzarella Company, located in Dallas’s Deep Ellum district, has Saturday afternoon classes where you can learn to make these same cheeses. It was a very fun and informative class!


My husband and I took this class along with friends a couple of weeks ago to help celebrate my husband’s birthday. We donned our “closed toe shoes,” arrived at our assigned time and were given aprons and lovely hairnets. After snapping a few selfies of our “lunch lady” look, phones were put away, hands were washed, and instructions were given.

The class started with us being told the history of The Mozzarella Company (begun in 1982 by Paula Lambert). We were also given a behind-the-scenes tour of the working kitchen and facility. Afterwards, we broke into couples, manned a workstation, and began our cheesemaking endeavor. The cheesemaking process starts with raw milk (cow or goat) being pasteurized and cultures being added. This mixture turns into curds and whey. The curds are used to make the mozzarella and the whey becomes the ricotta.

We began the hands-on part of the class with each person stepping up to the industrial-sized cooker and scooping out a ladle full of watery ricotta. We placed each scoopful into a plastic basket where this cottage cheese-looking mass cooled and dried. This became the freshly-made ricotta that we got to take home. Yum!

Next up, we were shown how to make mozzarella balls by stirring curds in hot water, draining, and stretching until it became a “satiny mass.” We were instructed to then push the cheese up through your fists (think lightbulb shape), pinch it off, and toss into cold water to firm it up. Viola! Now we had a bucket full of fresh mozzarella balls to take home as well.

We were successful so far and were ready for the next task – making string cheese. Each couple made string cheese by using the same technique. This time instead of forming a ball shape, we continued pulling and stretching the mozzarella until lumps were out and the cheese was like taffy – in a long, narrow, ribbon-like strip. We then salted the “ribbon” and squeezed fresh lime juice over its length before rolling it up like a ball of yarn. Now we had a string cheese ball, or Queso Oaxaca, to add to our water bucket.

Lastly, we made a mozzarella roll stuffed with olives. We began with the same technique but patted this cheese out flat, like a pizza dough. We then spread a layer of chopped olives evenly over the cheese before rolling the cheese into a tight “log” form. This was wrapped tight in plastic wrap and chilled for us to take home later. I must confess, it was delicious!

After each couple in the class had made the assigned cheeses, we were treated to a Wine and Cheese Tasting! In a small room off the kitchen, there were pre-made plates of The Mozzarella Company’s specialty award-winning, fresh and aged cheeses along with some breads and wines. This cheese plate was delicious! We tried Queso Menonina, Queso Blanco, Hoja Santa (wrapped in a leaf that gives it a mint & sassafras taste), Herb Goat Cheese Log, Deep Ellum Blue (a favorite, for sure!), Dolce Habanero (apricot & habanero…hot!) and Caciotta la Cocina (with all types of colorful herbs from “the kitchen”) and several other types that I have forgotten. At this point of the evening, I was busy stuffing my mouth with delicious cheese samples and not paying attention to our instructor. What a fun and enjoyable experience this had been!

Before we collected our cheeses, gathered up our belongings and said our goodbyes – we were asked to pose for a class photo while wearing our aprons and hairnets. We gladly obliged. And what did we all emphatically shout out prior to getting our photo taken?

CHEESE!! ūüôā

fruits of our labor!
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Max and David (the birthday boy)
some of my purchases!

Rosini Vineyards

Rockwall, TX

Rosini Vineyards

It is time to raise your glass – your wine glass that is. Napa Valley has come to Rockwall, Texas!

My husband and I were fortunate enough to attend Rosini Vineyard’s Grand Opening this past weekend. This beautiful vineyard had caught my eye several times while driving by on my way to and from Terrell. The perfectly-spaced grape vines out front and the gorgeous Italian-inspired building are quite impressive and certainly set the tone for a wonderful escape to Napa, Sonoma, or Tuscany. Let the night begin!

We entered the huge wooden doors and stepped into a large open, beautifully-decorated room and were immediately met by the owner, Greg Rosini. We appreciated his personal greeting and talked for several minutes. We were certainly made to feel welcome and learned a lot about Greg, his wife, and their vision for Rosini Vineyards. This was customer service at its best and something the staff here did very well the entire evening. Kudos!

A brief overview: Located on Hwy 205 between Rockwall and Terrell, Rosini Vineyards is the brainchild of Greg and Carol Rosini. Greg was originally in the restaurant equipment business and Carol worked in the commercial printing industry. They both closed this chapter of their life and decided on a new adventure – a winery it will be! In 2018 they bought the Double D Ranch, a rural 25-acre property in Rockwall County (east of Dallas) that came with ponds, barns, a house and a pool. It took 6 months to renovate the property that now functions as a Airbnb and VRBO rental. The new construction of the Italian-styled building began on the front of the property in the summer of 2020. It is now nearing completion. The entrance gate and a covered arbor in back were still under construction when we were there.

The main bulk of Rosini’s grapes are grown in other regions of Texas, many from east Texas, central Texas and the High Plains (Lubbock and Amarillo). Their first wines in 2019 were made from 19 tons of grapes at a “custom crush” facility in Nacogdoches. Greg and Carol are involved in every step of the winemaking. From the very second the grapes arrive through the crushing, tasting, bottling and label designs – they are 100% hands on.

The first harvest wines in 2019 were a Blanc du Bois (dry and semisweet), Cabernet Sauvignon, Tempranillo, Viognier, and a sweet Red Blend. Rosini wines were entered in the Lone Star International Wine Competition in 2020 and won a silver medal for their Blanc du Bois (dry version) and their Cabernet Sauvignon. I have tasted both and fully agree with the accolades bestowed upon them!

The Grand Opening we attended awarded us the chance to try these delicious wines along with a fabulous four-course “tasting meal” (think tapas) with wine pairings. We were welcomed with a tasty glass of champagne upon arrival and were given a coupon for a drink of our choice following the meal. Beautiful charcuterie boards were made available to us after our tasting meal so that we could graze, drink, and mingle with the other guests. The lovely sitting area inside the winery and the beautiful views from the back patio had all of us enjoying the food, drink and company. It was a most enjoyable evening!

Rosini Vineyards will soon be open to the public Thursday through Sunday. Stop in and visit their beautiful new grounds and have a glass of their award-winning wines. They will offer a limited food menu as well.

I may see you there. Look for the lady sitting contently with a glass of frozen blueberry/pomegranate/wine drink with a big ole smile on her face!

Cheers!!

Cedar Ridge Nature Preserve

Dallas, Texas

During this pandemic, all travel plans had to be postponed. Since I am one who craves adventure and loves to visit new places and see new things, my only option has been exploring local nature preserves, parks and trails. My husband and I have a list of day trip options to choose from so that we can get outdoors and explore new places while socially distancing and staying safe.

We have had a couple of “just okay” excursions (trashy urban parks). Our latest really enjoyable outing was to Cedar Ridge Nature Preserve which is located about twenty minutes southwest of downtown Dallas. This is a 600 acre tract of “hill country-like” land that I didn’t even know existed!

Our research revealed that the park is maintained by Audubon Dallas and includes 10 miles of walking trails (13 trails total) that loop through a hilly, heavily-forested area that is well-known for its unusual topography. We were sold! Cedar Ridge Preserve sounded like a great choice for an excursion so we packed a picnic lunch, loaded up, and made the 45 minute drive.

We arrived mid-morning on a warm, sunny weekend and the parking lot was packed. Note to self: next time get an earlier start! The main park buildings, education center and water fountains are closed due to the pandemic (restrooms were open). I highly suggest bringing your own water or snacks and wearing sturdy shoes for the trails.

Once inside the preserve, there was a large signage board where the trail heads begin. It shows a detailed map of all the trails, routes, and the distances. There is also information depicting plants and animals you may encounter. There seemed to be trails for all skill levels. We began with the 1 mile Bluebonnet Trail and it was lovely and not crowded. The trail is unpaved with natural rocks, roots, and leaves this time of year. The Bluebonnet Trail had a gentle terrain with a lookout point midway that overlooked the valley and Joe Pool Lake. We also took a few minutes to stand in a “nature blind” to watch a rare bird species (black-capped vireos) dart to and from a watering hole. There was a wide variety of prairie grasses, trees, mosses, plants, cacti and birds that we spotted along the way.

After looping back to the main trailhead, we chose an intermediate trail for our next hike. This second trail had more limestone hills, good canopy cover, several bridges, and more steps. This more diverse terrain was rich with juniper, honeysuckle, yucca, sumac, prickly pear, oak and other types of native trees, grasses and wildflowers. It also granted us a pretty good workout!

There are trails with varying degrees of difficulty. Some are very flat. Some have more inclines, descents, and more cardio challenges. No matter what trail you choose, you will not be able to miss the unique and beautiful limestone hills, bluffs, and ridges that resemble the terrain found in and around the Texas Hill Country.

I was really impressed with this little slice of nature within the Dallas metro area and thoroughly enjoyed my day here. I think we all deserve a place where we can unplug, get outdoors, breathe fresh air, exercise and connect with nature in a personal way. Cedar Ridge Nature Preserve is a bright spot among all the asphalt, heavy traffic, and the grind of our daily lives. Check it out!

I’ll see you on the trail!

Note: Dogs on leashes are welcome. The preserve requires no fee but suggests a $3 donation. Check the website before venturing out due to closures of the park and trails during the pandemic.

Jimmy’s Food Store

Dallas, Texas

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I had been hearing rumblings regarding Jimmy’s Food Store in Dallas for many years. I finally made the trip into Dallas for my first visit before the Christmas holiday (which I would not suggest due to the crowds) and now I am hooked!

Jimmy’s Food Store is a local Dallas gem that has been owned and operated by the DiCarlo family since 1966. They carry imported Italian foods, fresh produce, and wine. Jimmy’s can best be described as a little Italian grocery store/deli/sandwich counter.¬†

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The neighborhood around Jimmy’s is a little sketchy. Parking is abysmal on weekends and peak times. The food aisles are narrow and crowded. Checkout lines are long.¬† Nonetheless, Jimmy’s is still worth a trip. It is essentially a NYC deli without the plane ride hassle. All the imperfections somehow make it that much more authentic.

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At the store entrance, grab a shopping cart or basket. There you may order a $4 glass of wine or cup of espresso to sip on while you shop or wait for a sandwich order. As you walk through the haphazardly organized aisles, you will find many varieties of sauces, pastas, olives, pesto, jams, relishes, olive oils, flours, etc. A couple of racks display freshly baked breads. Several shelves are stacked with Italian cookies, sweets, and candies.

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Jimmy’s carries anything and everything you would need to make the perfect Italian meal. And if you don’t want to cook, they sell frozen homemade lasagnas, pizzas, ravioli, manicotti, gnocchi, and desserts. All that I have tried are delicious! The refrigerated section is full of pizza dough, ricotta, mozzarella, and marinara sauces. One deli counter sells all types of cheeses, deli meats, olives, peppers, etc. The prosciutto, parma ham, and provolone were outstanding.

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At the back of the store is the sandwich counter that doubles as a cold meat deli counter. Meats that are sold here include homemade Italian sausages, cured bacon, steaks, and meatballs. There is a poster tacked up to the side with sandwich options. I have tried the muffaletta and the meatball sub and both were excellent and generously portioned. There are a couple of small tables scattered throughout the store and out front, if you choose to eat on location.

 

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Jimmy’s would not be a place where I would shop weekly but I will certainly shop here for special occasion meals. The meatball & sausage lasagna, panettone, fennel meatballs, cheeses and deli meats were well enjoyed by my family over the holidays. My husband and I have recently had the frozen manicotti, stuffed shells, prosciutto, and meatballs and all were easy and delicious.

Go there – get some – enjoy! Viva, Italia!!

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Diamond Beach

Iceland

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A recent trip to Iceland was filled with surreal environments. I saw moss-covered lava fields, towering volcanoes, basalt walls, gigantic glaciers, powerful waterfalls, and steaming geysers. One of my favorite sights of the entire trip was the beautiful Diamond Beach near Jokulsarlon Glacier Lagoon.

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Diamond Beach is about a five-hour drive from Reykjavik along the southern coast of Iceland. This area is a constantly changing, natural environment and is breathtakingly beautiful. Every minute provides a different experience according to the weather, the lighting, and the number of icebergs and ice chunks that have made their way to the shore.

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Diamond Beach is exactly what it sounds like, except for the fact that there will not be any sunbathers on this stretch of sand! The sparkling black, lava sands are filled with bits and pieces of passing icebergs as they break away from the nearby glacier. These 1000-year-old ice blocks break from the melting glacier, make their way through the glacial lagoon, float down a glacial river, and enjoy their last moments before being washed into the Atlantic Ocean. This is where the smaller bergs come to rest as they are scattered along the coastline and the sand becomes covered in ice. Sizes range from tiny, glittering shards to car-sized behemoths.

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These polished pieces of ancient glacial ice get caught up in the ocean current and end up scattered back onto the black sand beach. Each one reflects the light and they sparkle like “ice diamonds” – hence the name Diamond Beach. The ice takes on may different forms and colors, ranging from clear to white to blue. Walking among the ice chunks was like visiting an outdoor ice sculpture garden. The experience was very unusual, beautiful, and unforgettable.

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My travel group visited the Diamond Beach one morning in early October. Luckily for us, the beach was not crowded. The weather was rather messy (cold, cloudy, and windy) and the tides were pretty rough so we had to use caution (sneaker waves are very dangerous in this area).  Fortunately, we got to take advantage of some great photo opportunities and we enjoyed every minute spent here.

 

It was a truly magical experience.

A few of us may have accidentally gotten our feet very wet and cold. Just sayin! ūüôā

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Poston Gardens

Waxahachie, TX

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I may never have the opportunity to travel to Holland in my lifetime to see tulips, but I have made it to a couple of tulip farms in Texas. That may be as close as I ever get! Does that count?

Last year my husband and trekked a hour north of Dallas to Texas Tulips in Pilot Point, Texas. This year, we drove an hour south of Dallas to quaint Waxahachie, Texas to check out the new Poston Gardens. 

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We visited  Poston Gardens this past weekend and were some of the first visitors on a beautiful Sunday morning. Parking was on-site and the entrance fee was $10 per person. Tulip stems run $3.00 each and you may keep both the tulip and bulb. The staff was most helpful and very friendly. We soon had a plan and a large plastic basket and were off on our way to pick tulips. 

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Several staff members drive carts throughout the fields and we quickly hitched a ride to the bottom (and largest) field that is home to over 400,000 tulips. The colors were a sensory overload! After picking and exploring here, we worked our way back up to three other fields on foot. Walking is easy, all the paths are well-marked. Rows of tulips are spaced far enough apart to make it all very easy.

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The flowers are breathtakingly beautiful! Candy colors, neon colors, soft pastels, pale whites – you name it – they are in full bloom!! There were 26 types of tulips planted this year and I loved and wanted them all. We managed to come home with 40 fresh stems (quite a few bulbs) and currently have two gorgeous tulip bouquets brightening up our home. A staff member gave us info on how to preserve our tulip bulbs so that we can plant them ourselves this winter. Hopefully we will be growing a few beautiful tulips in our yard next Spring! Fingers crossed.

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These tulip fields in Waxahachie are very new. Poston Gardens just opened on March 15th of this year. The owner, John Poston, has planted 40 acres of this 60 acre farm with over 1 million tulips. Mr. Poston decided to use his farm land to grow and sell tulips to help support Daymark Living¬†(a facility located next door to Poston Gardens). Daymark is a resort-style community that teaches people with intellectual and developmental delays to live more independently.¬†Poston’s 23-year-old son was born with Down syndrome and once he turned 18, there weren’t a lot of options for him to live a normal, independent life. Frustrated, Poston planned and built Daymark to help his son and others like him gain valuable life skills.¬†¬†For every tulip sold, a portion of the profits goes directly to Daymark and its mission. Some of the Daymark residents even work in the gardens.

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The four large tulip fields are spread throughout the gently rolling farmland with some beautiful views. There are tents at a couple of locations where staffers will count, wrap, and prepare your tulips for the trip home. There are also restrooms, food trucks, and picnic tables located on the property. You can spend as little or as much time here as you choose. 

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If you are interested in tulip picking this year, GO SOON!  Poston Gardens will only be open for a few more weeks or as long as the tulips remain (usually through April). It was a fun experience for us both and makes us feel even better knowing that we contributed to a good cause.

Enjoy!

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(Suggestions: 1. Take a trowel if you want to extract the bulbs with the blooms.  2. Take a large container of cool water to place tulips in for the ride home  3. Wear gardening gloves to keep hands and nails clean!)  

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Mille Lire

Dallas, Texas

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I love having friends who are foodies! They are a wealth of information regarding new restaurants, new food trends, and the latest recipes. One of my best “foodie friends” just happened to turn me on to Mille Lire.

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Mille Lire is a great little Italian restaurant located in the Dallas Arts District near Cedar Springs, in the Centrum Building.¬†From the second I walked in, I liked it. I was impressed with the chic, modern decor and the “homey” feel. The tables were beautifully set. Interesting art work was located throughout the dining rooms. A high glass ceiling, colorful floor tiles, big windows, and beautiful¬†lighting fixtures created a warm, welcoming atmosphere. So far, so good!

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The hostess was welcoming and my husband and I were promptly seated at our table in the middle of the restaurant. Our server made us feel welcome and delivered the right amount of attentiveness throughout our meal. The cocktail and wine lists were impressive and the menu selections were very appealing. Now it was time to make some tough decisions!

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I opted for a glass of Amore Prosecco and it was cool and crisp – just the way I like it. My husband ordered the Italiano Mule and it was awesome! Limoncello was the secret ingredient that gave the mule its special¬† “oomph!” Delicioso on both counts.

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We chose the Roasted Cauliflower and the Roasted Beet Salad for our antipasti. The cauliflower florets were drizzled with Thai chili cream sauce and the flavor was amazing. The roasted beets were cut into bite-size squares and were served with goat cheese, toasted pistachios and orange slices. The textures, flavors, and plating of both of these appetizers was spot-on. Our server also brought over a complimentary bread basket, creamy butter, and dipping oil that was a nice addition to our other dishes.

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For our entrees, we decided to try a couple of the housemade pasta dishes. We opted for the Fettuccine Carbonara and the Pappardelle al Ragu. The fettuccine dish was served al dente with pecorino cheese, pancetta, a poached egg, and topped with crispy Brussels sprouts. This dish was rich, creamy, and delicious and made for some great leftovers. The pappardelle was also al dente and was served with a bold sauce of dry-aged beef bolognese, tomatoes, and fresh grated parmesan. This was authentic Italian cooking at its best – simple and flavorful.

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Dessert might have been my favorite part of the meal…no surprise there! My husband and I shared a piece of Ricotta & Amaretto Cheesecake topped with wild cherries. At this point, I really, really wished I had not agreed to share. I would have licked the saucer clean if it would not have embarrassed my husband! The slice of cheesecake was creamy and smooth with the perfect amount of sweetness versus tartness. More, please!

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At one point during our dinner, I saw the chef come out from the open kitchen and talk to a few patrons. Giuliana Matarese is the owner and executive chef of Mille Lire. He was born and raised in Napoli and has over 20 years experience at top-notch restaurants, including in NYC. This new restaurant of his just received the 2018 Open Table Diner’s Choice Award, so they must be doing something right! Mille Lire is not open just for dinner hours. They also offer “Pranzo Veloce”¬† (quick lunch) specials Tuesday thru Friday and a Prosecco Brunch with a Live DJ on Sundays.

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My husband and I really enjoyed our visit and I would love to return soon to try their Sunday brunch and Prosecco Bar. I hope you will check them out the next time you are in the mood for some authentic Italian fare. Buon appetito!

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