Tag Archive | glaciers

Diamond Beach

Iceland

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A recent trip to Iceland was filled with surreal environments. I saw moss-covered lava fields, towering volcanoes, basalt walls, gigantic glaciers, powerful waterfalls, and steaming geysers. One of my favorite sights of the entire trip was the beautiful Diamond Beach near Jokulsarlon Glacier Lagoon.

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Diamond Beach is about a five-hour drive from Reykjavik along the southern coast of Iceland. This area is a constantly changing, natural environment and is breathtakingly beautiful. Every minute provides a different experience according to the weather, the lighting, and the number of icebergs and ice chunks that have made their way to the shore.

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Diamond Beach is exactly what it sounds like, except for the fact that there will not be any sunbathers on this stretch of sand! The sparkling black, lava sands are filled with bits and pieces of passing icebergs as they break away from the nearby glacier. These 1000-year-old ice blocks break from the melting glacier, make their way through the glacial lagoon, float down a glacial river, and enjoy their last moments before being washed into the Atlantic Ocean. This is where the smaller bergs come to rest as they are scattered along the coastline and the sand becomes covered in ice. Sizes range from tiny, glittering shards to car-sized behemoths.

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These polished pieces of ancient glacial ice get caught up in the ocean current and end up scattered back onto the black sand beach. Each one reflects the light and they sparkle like “ice diamonds” – hence the name Diamond Beach. The ice takes on may different forms and colors, ranging from clear to white to blue. Walking among the ice chunks was like visiting an outdoor ice sculpture garden. The experience was very unusual, beautiful, and unforgettable.

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My travel group visited the Diamond Beach one morning in early October. Luckily for us, the beach was not crowded. The weather was rather messy (cold, cloudy, and windy) and the tides were pretty rough so we had to use caution (sneaker waves are very dangerous in this area).  Fortunately, we got to take advantage of some great photo opportunities and we enjoyed every minute spent here.

 

It was a truly magical experience.

A few of us may have accidentally gotten our feet very wet and cold. Just sayin! ūüôā

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Icefields Parkway

Alberta, Canada

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My husband and I had the opportunity to travel to Lake Louise in Alberta, Canada this past August and we set aside one full day to drive the Icefields Parkway. What a experience it turned out to be!

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The Icefields Parkway (Hwy 93) runs from Lake Louise in Banff National Park to Jasper in Jasper National Park. This 144-mile scenic drive is rated the “Top Drive in the World” by Conde’ Nast Traveller and it didn’t take us long into the drive to see why. The double-lane highway winds along the Continental Divide through soaring mountain peaks, turquoise lakes, sweeping valleys, ancient glaciers, cascading waterfalls, dramatic rock spires and thick pine forests. We looked forward to a fresh new wonder around every corner. There were¬† plenty of scenic stops, picnic spots, hiking trails and clean portable toilets along the entire route.¬†¬†

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We filled up our gas tank in Lake Louise (there is only one service station along the route) and began our journey. Our first stop along the way was the Crowfoot Glacier. We took advantage¬†of the many places where we could pull off the highway to take spectacular photos or find a trailhead to hike. We took our time driving and made many “must-see” stops along the way – with Crowfoot Glacier being our first.

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Just up the highway was Bow Lake, a beautiful mountain lake with turquoise water, framed by dark green evergreens on shore. Next up was Peyto Lake, the perfect Canadian Rockies photo op. We parked here and took an easy 15-minute stroll along a paved trail to the overlook. This viewpoint was the highest elevation on the Icefields Parkway and gave us spectacular views of the glacial valley and gorgeous lake below. It was breathtaking!

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The halfway point between Banff and Jasper was the Saskatchewan Crossing. Not only were the river views here very scenic (including bighorn sheep!), this was the only stop for lunch, gasoline, and cell coverage. There were a couple of small restaurants, restrooms, and a small general store as well. We filled the rental car up, grabbed a quick soup & sandwich lunch, and hit the road again. 

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One of my favorite stops was the Columbia Icefield Рthe largest glacial icefield south of the Arctic Circle. This whole area made me feel like I was in another world, on another planet. The landscape resembles the moon Рor what I picture the moon surface to be. We hiked the area and climbed up on rocky mounds for stunning views of the glittering glaciers all around us. It was a 360-degree view of ancient glaciers, ragged mountain peaks, and rivers of silty, glacier water run-off. There is a huge Glacier Discover Centre here where tourists can actually board an Ice Explorer bus that takes you up on the Athabasca Glacier and lets you walk on the thick ice. We chose to bypass the crowds and the long lines and explore on our own. It was an experience that I will never forget. 

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We were lucky that there were so many other sights and experiences from that day that we will never forget. We stopped and enjoyed the beauty and serenity of Herbert Lake. We admired the scenic views from Big Hill & Big Bend. We hiked up to the loud and powerful Sunwapta Falls.  How could anyone with a sense of adventure not enjoy exploring a place with landmarks named Mosquito Creek, Tangle Falls, Weeping Wall, Mushroom Peak and Goats & Glaciers? What a great day!

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I can easily see why National Geographic referred to this route as “the most beautiful journey on the planet.” It was the most beautiful drive I have ever experienced and every few miles offered a change of scenery. Words really can’t describe it and photos really don’t do it justice. I am just so thankful that David and I had to chance to experience driving the Icefields Parkway once in our lifetime.¬†I hope you get the opportunity as well.¬†

Safe travels!

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Lake Louise

Alberta, Canada

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Banff has always been on my radar. It was not until our dentist visited there and passed on her experiences that we decided to make this trip happen sooner, rather than later. Dr. Williamson, our long-time family dentist, painted a detailed picture in my mind of towering peaks, gorgeous mountain lakes, ancient glaciers, the perfect hotel, and delicious foods.  I was sold. Plans were made. Passports were dusted off. Bags were packed. Canada, here we come!

My husband and I flew into Calgary and rented a car to drive the two hours into Banff National Park. Needless to say, most of the drive was breathtakingly beautiful as we headed towards the heart of the Canadian Rockies on a warm August afternoon.

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on the Post Hotel grounds

Over one hundred years ago, Lake Louise (named after Princess Louise Caroline Alberta, the fourth daughter of Queen Victoria)  was just a wild outpost at the end of the Canadian Pacific Railway. It was mainly a base for outdoor enthusiasts, thrill-seekers, and hunters.  Today Lake Louise is a luxury resort area that is famous for its gorgeous lakes, mountain tea houses, grizzly bears, and hiking trails.  This area attracts large crowds of tourists from all over the world in the summer season. I was not surprised to hear Spanish, Farsi, Norwegian, German, French, Japanese, and Chinese all spoken around me in the span of 15 minutes at the Fairmont Chateau. We had all come together in this place to share in one of the most unforgettable and spectacular sights in North America.

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Fairmont Chateau Lake Louise

In the early afternoon, we arrived in the town of Lake Louise and checked in to the Post Hotel. Once again, Dr. Williamson had given us excellent advice! This was a small, boutique hotel located steps away from The Village (main shopping center with small grocery store, deli, bakery, visitor’s center, grill, etc.).¬† The Post Hotel was situated along the shores of the Pipestone River in a beautiful area with wonderful views. It was luxurious, quaint, and had wonderful amenities – including afternoon tea and a five-star restaurant. We loved everything about it – even the bear spray you checked out each day from the front desk!¬†

Ours plans the first day were to drive to the “actual” Lake Louise and hike up to the Lake Agnes Teahouse. This is a popular hiking trail that begins on the edge of the lake near the iconic Fairmont Lake Louise Chateau. This mountainous trail leads 5+ miles (round trip) to a lovely little rustic tea house that was built in 1905 and sits on the shoreline of another idyllic alpine lake, Lake Agnes.¬† This hike ended up being newsworthy enough to get a blog all to itself!¬† More of this excursion to come at a later date………

We headed to Lake Louise very early this particular morning to procure parking as it fills up very quickly. We grabbed our hiking gear and walked a short distance from the parking area to the shoreline. We stepped out of the treeline onto the shore and I was speechless.

The views were surreal.

Lake Louise is simply a postcard that you step into.

 

Lake Louise is what makes Banff National Park such a popular destination. I find it impossible to describe without resorting to shameless cliches. The lake is most famous for its glacier-fed, mirror-like, turquoise water. It is surrounded on three sides by soaring snow-capped mountain peaks and a stately shoreline chateau (The Fairmont) on one end. When you stand next to this serene lake and gaze out onto Victoria Glacier, the glassy water, and the towering mountains – it is no wonder that this breathtakingly beautiful place is the most photographed sight in the Canadian Rockies. Unfortunately, photos really can’t do it justice. The 360-degree views seem unreal. Words are lost as your senses take over.

Our first full day in Lake Louise turned out to be amazing! Now we needed to plan the remainder of our stay. Luckily, the town of Lake Louise turned out to be the perfect base for our summer trip. What to do next? There was plenty of hiking, kayaking, cycling, and canoeing opportunities in the area. There were also more sights to see than we had days to see them! We had to prioritize and plan our agenda for the remainder of our stay.

We visited Lake Moraine, another spectacular mountain lake with stunning views and well worth a visit. We drove the Icefields Parkway. This is a beautiful drive from Lake Louise to Jasper that takes you by glorious lakes, waterfalls, mountain views, a glacier field, hiking trails, lookout points, etc. The scenery was amazing! 

One sunny afternoon was spent riding up one of ski slopes in the Lake Louise Gondola. This proved to be another fun activity and the views were great. Another day was spent in Yoho National Park hiking around Emerald Lake, seeing the Natural Bridge, and hiking up to Takakawa Falls. There was so much natural beauty surrounding us – too much to see and way too little time! At the end of each day, it was so nice to return to our quiet, little hotel. We enjoyed afternoon tea, wine on the lawn, and delicious four-course gourmet meals. I really did not want to leave at he end of our stay.

We thoroughly enjoyed our wonderful stay and visit to the village of Lake Louise. I will never forget the scenery and the experiences we had here. Great memories were made! Now we were off to the towns of Banff and Canmore and then on to Calgary for a few days. More stories to tell!

Stay tuned.

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Bow Summit and Peyto Lake

 

Rocky Mountain National Park

Estes Park, CO

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Lace up your hiking boots and get ready to head to one of Mother Nature’s brightest stars – Rocky Mountain National Park.¬†Not only is this one of my favorite places on earth, National Geographic agrees and named it “one of the best trip destinations in the world.”

The park entrances are located 75 miles west of Denver and on the edge of the scenic town of Estes Park, Colorado. The drive to Estes Park has some stunning views and once inside the park, the scenery is even more breathtakingly beautiful. This vast mountain wilderness is a natural masterpiece with views of jagged peaks, high mountain lakes, waterfalls, wooded forests, grassy tundras, and 130-million-year-old glaciers. The Continental Divide runs right through the center of the park and the headwaters of the Colorado River begin here. It is a very impressive place, to say the least.

Rocky Mountain National Park was established in 1915 and covers 415 square miles. It is one of those places that can be enjoyed by all ages and activity levels. You may choose to see the entire park while riding in the comfort of your vehicle. Drive along¬†the Trail Ridge Road, the highest continuously paved highway in North America, to the Alpine Visitor Center (elevation 11,800 ft.) and you will feel like you are on top of the world!¬†If you are a more active person, you can take advantage of all the hiking, rock climbing, camping, fishing and winter skiing that the park allows. There are almost 400 miles of maintained hiking trails throughout the park that go through the grassy valleys, aspen and pine forests, and around mountain lakes. Some of the more challenging trails run along rock slides, waterfalls and on up to several mountain peaks. How about a hike up to the 14,260 ft. summit of Long’s Peak? Yep, me neither!

I have had the opportunity to visit this park in spring, summer and fall and I must admit that each season was very unique in its own way. Early spring had many of the park roads closed due to snow and ice – but it was wonderful hiking around frozen lakes in the snow and watching locals suit up for cross county skiing and snowshoeing. It was truly a winter wonderland with pristine snow, bright blue skies and few people.¬†Summer brought out the green grasses, new forest growth, and fields of beautiful wildflowers. The temperature was great and the streams and lakes were crystal clear and very cold from the icy snow melt. Fall was a burst of colors. The trees turned every shade of yellow, orange and red and stood out from all the green pines, spruces, and firs. Animals were more visible as they were “chowing down” and storing fat before the winter came. Each season brings something new and different to the park and I was lucky to witness the various stages.

I have many favorite memories from my visits here. I loved hiking at a couple of the lakes with my husband last April. We trudged through deep powdery snow and followed trails through the forest along the water’s edge. The weather was mild and the sky was bright blue. John Denver’s music played in my head, “the serenity of a clear blue mountain lake” could not have been more appropriate. We sat and drank it all in. On another visit the following year, we hiked over a field of granite boulders and enjoyed a picnic at the Alluvial Fan. The waterfall here was amazing! One of the best experiences I had at Rocky Mountain National Park was a late summer morning when my friend Britten Echols and I arrived early to spend the day there exploring. Our first stop was at Sprague Lake. We were immediately shocked at the sight of a nearby momma moose, a baby moose (hidden in the grass close to us) and a young male moose¬† – both calmly standing in the lake eating moss. It was a “pinch me” moment and certainly not something we were used to seeing everyday in Texas! We walked around this entire lake and had a great picnic lunch before heading off for an afternoon hike around Bear Lake. By the end of this magical day, we had encountered several chipmunks, mule deer, a huge rutting elk, and a whole herd of bighorn sheep. It was an unbelievable day.

If you enjoy wildlife, adventure and nature – add Rocky Mountain National Park to the top of your bucket list! This whole park encompasses a breathtaking collection of mountains (most with elevations over 12,000 ft.), high tundras, gorgeous vistas, dense forests, 7 glaciers, 2 waterfalls, 147 lakes, and a treasure trove of animals. You can camp, rent a cabin, book a hotel in nearby Estes Park, or drive from the Denver area for a day trip. The park is open 365 days a year, 24 hours per day. Cost can range from $20-$70 per day, depending on the season, and I can promise the trip will be priceless!

“The mountains are calling and I must go.” – John Muir

Me too, John….me too.

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