Yamnuska Wolfdog Sanctuary

Cochrane, Alberta

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My husband and I are dog-lovers and I actually worked for veterinarians for many years, so canines are near and dear to our hearts. When vacationing in Canada a couple of months ago, we both were excited to visit Yamnuska Wolfdog Sanctuary. 

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Yamnuska Wolfdog Sanctuary (a non-profit) is an impressive organization that has put a lot of time, dedication, and thought into their facility and cause. As wolf hybrids became more popular in their area, this group identified the need for a knowledgeable and experienced rescue organization. They opened the doors in 2011 as one of the largest sanctuaries in Canada and the only one to balance education with adoption opportunities. Today, their main purpose is to educate the public on wolfdogs and to raise awareness regarding wolf conservation – all while providing some of these regal creatures a great home.

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The sanctuary sits on 160 acres of beautiful, tree-covered acreage with large, natural areas for the wolfdogs to live and run. Each enclosure is one to two acres with diverse vegetation to provide a happy, healthy, and stress-free environment.  When we visited in August there were 23 permanent wolfdog residents, 10 ambassadors, and a few adoption possibilities.

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As we explored the facility, we noticed small signs throughout the sanctuary enclosures that listed interesting wolf facts. Other signs identified their permanent wolfdogs with photos, names and information regarding that particular individual. The entire place was immaculate and paths were well-maintained. We enjoyed being on our own, taking our time, and wandering throughout the facility on the designated paths. I particularly enjoyed photographing these animals in their natural habitat.

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We paid for one of the sanctuary’s introductory tours and were escorted around by a volunteer who did a great job explaining all about the organization and their purpose. She gave us great information about the actual wolfdogs including their diet, history, care, training, appearance, etc. We did not get to physically touch any of the wolfdogs but did get to see them up close and personal with just a regular-height wire fence between us. We were told that all wolves and their hybrids have black-rimmed, amber eyes and their ears are full of thick hair. Their feet are extremely large for their bodies and toes are webbed. Bodies are thin and lithe with long legs. Tails are fluffy and never wag – they are usually held straight out or down. Coats are rough and thick. Blood tests can be done to determine how “low or high” each one’s “wolf ” content is but much can be determined by physical appearance and personality. We certainly learned a lot! 

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We were also told many other fascinating facts about these magnificent creatures and how difficult it is to own one. They are not “wild” enough to live as wolves and full-blooded wolves will not accept them into their packs. They are not “dog” enough to make great pets due to their wolf-like traits. They are master diggers and climbers and cannot be kept as backyard pets. They crave freedom and independence. They need excessive exercise and stimulation or they become very destructive. They are very possessive and territorial. They are naturally timid and shy. They have a high-prey drive. They have no desire to “please” or mind an owner. They do not want to be left alone for long periods of time. They will not learn tricks or commands.  At this point, our headstrong yorkie was starting to look good and a lot less challenging! We were quickly convinced that it takes a very special person to adopt these wolfdogs – what a challenge! 

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Why is there such a need for place like Yamnuska Wolfdog Sanctuary? People want to breed dogs with wolves and think it will be “cool” or make one appear “tough” to have a wolf-hybrid. Hybrid puppies are sold for thousands of dollars to uninformed owners who have no idea what they are getting into. Little do these new owners know what the future problems and issues will be – many that I just listed. Most of these wolfdogs end up in shelters where they are euthanized.  Yamnuska Wolfdog Sanctuary saves many of these wolfdogs from euthanasia. They also rehabilitate some, adopt others (most with lower wolf content),  and continue to educate the public on the plight of these hybrids.

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This facility believes in the ethical and humane treatment of all animals, so it was no surprise that there is also a barnyard filled with other rescued animals. We enjoyed visiting with geese, roosters, chickens, a coydog (coyote/dog mix), a donkey and numerous goats (who have their own Instagram account – #goatsofyamnuska) that have all been rescued and now happily live on the property. The goats were a hoot!

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The people working here all seemed very passionate about these animals and it showed.  Their dedication to these creatures was blatantly obvious. It was a most impressive place and the private tour ended up being one of our favorite parts of this Canadian vacation. We loved it – and learned a lot in the process.

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If you are the least bit interested in dogs and/or wolves, Yamnuska Wolfdog Sanctuary is well worth the drive from Calgary or Lake Louise to experience this one-of-a-kind rescue center. It was a great, albeit unusual, experience and one that I will never forget!

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