The Freedom Trail

Boston, Massachusetts

If you find yourself lucky enough to be in Boston for a day or two, the Freedom Trail is a “must see – must do.” Just follow the red brick line on the sidewalks throughout Boston and you be led on the 2.5 mile tour of 16 American Revolution sites. This is a great outdoor activity perfect for most ages and especially suited for history buffs. Just wear comfortable shoes and plan on spending 2-5 hours walking, exploring, visiting historic sites, and best of all – getting to know the city.

They are several ways to enjoy the Freedom Trail. My suggestion is to do it on your own so that you can spend as much or as little time as you choose at each location. If you get too tired the first day, stop. Pick it up the next day where you left off and do different parts on different days. For the techies, there is a phone app you can download ($4.99) that can be very helpful. There are also paper maps (for us old folks) that you can get from stops throughout the city or from your hotel. The National Park Service has a visitor’s center at Faneuil Hall where they offer tours and give out free maps. There are also several independent tour companies that offer 1-hour guided tours, private tours with a driver, or photowalks. (Photowalks are led by someone helping you capture each historic site in the best light and from the best vantage point.) You will see various tour groups at several of the stops. They are hard to miss since the tour guides are dressed in period costumes, wigs, stockings, shoes, tricorn hats, etc. 

My husband and I have always preferred walking the trail on our own. That way, we can stop for a lobster roll, a bowl of clam chowder, and maybe even a pastachio cannoli  – whenever the mood strikes! The trail takes you by some fabulous places to eat or stop for a “spot o’ tea”, a cup of coffee, or a cold brew. We actually had lunch with Benjamin Franklin one day! How many people do you know that can say that?

Most of the Freedom Trail guides will start you at Boston Common – America’s oldest public park and in front of the gold-domed Massachusetts State House. It will end at the Bunker Hill Monument. You see famous sites, old buildings, interesting people, the North End (Little Italy), the financial area, markets, eateries, churches and graveyards. Some of the streets are very quaint and narrow since they were first made in the 1600’s for horses, carriages and wagons – not the heavy city traffic we all know today. All of the historic sights are very well conserved and attended. Thirteen of the sixteen stops are free, and three require a small admission fee (Paul Revere’s House, the Old South meeting House and Old State House).

If you only have one day, be sure to see the Old North Church, the site of the Boston Massacre, Paul Revere’s House, Faneuil Hall,  and Granary Burial Ground. The last time we stayed in Boston, our hotel was right across the street from the Granary Burial Grounds. This cemetery is one of my favorite places in Boston. It dates back to 1660 and houses the remains of Samuel Adams, victims of the Boston Massacre,  Peter Faneuil, Mary “Mother” Goose, John Hancock, and Paul Revere. If you remember your history lessons, only 5 civilians were killed in the Boston “Massacre.” The Revolutionists’ great PR team made it seem a much more tragic event to play up the role of the evil, murdering British. 

There is a small pub across the street from Granary Burial Grounds. We were told by our Duck Tour guide that “this is the only place in Boston where you can drink a cold Samuel Adams while looking out over a cold, dead Samuel Adams.” Tasteless – but still kind of funny!

There is SO much history in Boston. Take it all in. It makes you proud of those early Americans who rose up against a mighty nation and demanded their rights and civil liberties. Walking the Freedom Trail puts it all in perspective – at least it did for me. It is hard to stand on the hill in the North End and look up at the tall steeple of the Old North Church and not think about Paul Revere and his midnight ride….”one if by land, two if by sea.” When you walk the Freedom Trail, you are truly walking in the footsteps of our forefathers. Walk tall and walk proud….and please do not forget that cannoli!

 

 

Please feel free to leave comments. If you like reading my travel and dining experiences, subscribe to my blog and you will get future postings. Thanks for reading about Boston’s Freedom Trail from my perspective. I hope you enjoyed it!

 

 

 

 

 

8 thoughts on “The Freedom Trail

  1. Great article. I last visited Boston on a trip planned for our kids, to show them the colonial and revolutionary sites of Boston, New York, and Philadelphia. Though I’ve always enjoyed Boston, Independence Hall in Philly was the most special to me as the origin of what makes us Americans.

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  2. I love Boston and was taken right back reading your blog! I’m jealous of your lunch with Benjamin Franklin!

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  3. Boston is my most favorite city in the entire USA. Thank you for your magnificent writing as it allowed me to walk down my own memory lane of my time spent in the city taking in as much history as I could!

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